Planning

Kitchen layouts

L Shape Kitchen

The popular L layout provides space for a seating area in the kitchen. This kitchen layout causes longer distances to be travelled because of the tall and/or side cabinets that are positioned on each of the ends. The corner is very versatile as it has a large amount of potential storage space. Special corner cabinets with pullouts create additional space.


 

U – Shape Kitchen

The U kitchen is ideal for optimal zone design. This kitchen layout enables the best possible work flows with the shortest distances. The space between the rows should be at least 120cms so that there is enough space for the pullout systems to be open simultaneously. Corners are very versatile as they have large potential for storage space. Special corner cabinets with pullouts create additional space.


 

Island Kitchen

Island kitchens are ideal when there is enough space and the kitchen is to be open to the living area. The island or half island can be accessed from all sides. Usually, the cooking and preparation zones are located here. Adding the sink to the island makes this the optimal zone arrangement as far ergonomics goes.


 

G – Shape Kitchen

The G kitchen is the least used kitchen layout and requires a lot of space. However, it does provide excellent opportunity for optional zone design. The freestanding row of cabinets separates the kitchen from the living area, but still allows communication between the two. The important thing to remember however is that the ‘entrance’ to the kitchen should be large enough. The space between the rows should be at least 120cms so the there is enough space for the pullout systems to be open simultaneously. Special corner cabinets with pullouts create additional space.


 

Galley Kitchen

Zone planning optimises working conditions in a galley ‘double row’ kitchen. Switching to a different zone is as easy as turning around. The space between the rows should be at least 120cm so that there is enough space for the pullout systems to be open simultaneously. When a door and a window sit opposite one another in a room, the galley kitchen is the best solution.


 

In-Line Kitchen

– While it’s true that an inline ‘single row’ kitchen only requires one standing wall and fewer work areas, it is rather less effective from an ergonomic standpoint. Even with zone planning, this layout cause the longest journey distances since you often have to go from one end of the kitchen to the other during kitchen activities.


 

The Kitchen Working Triangle

The concept of the ‘kitchen working triangle’ gives the user functionality in the kitchen area not to mention a pleasure to prepare meals and work in. These principles have been around for years and should be utilised as best as possible.

Tips on the kitchen working triangle

The kitchen working triangle is made up of the three main focal points of a kitchen – the sink, stove and fridge.

  • The distance from the sink to the stove to the fridge and back again should be between 3.6 and 8.2 metres.
  • Each side of the triangle should measure between 1.2 and 2.74 metres.
  • The sink should be located between or across from the stove and fridge.
  • Kitchen aisles should be at least 1.1 metres wide to allow people to move around and appliances and cupboard doors to be opened easily.
  • Ideally, you should have a work surface either side of your sink and stove to allow adequate room for food preparation.
  • For kitchen renovations, existing plumbing fixtures need to be taken into consideration for placement of the sink as to relocate plumbing could be costly.